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All Posts Tagged: html

Under-Engineered Text Boxen

Others in this sorta-series: Under-Engineered Custom Radio Buttons and Checkboxen Under-Engineered Toggles Under-Engineered Toggles Too This is the latest, and not last, in my informal series of posts on under-engineered controls. Generally I am looking at the minimum amount of CSS necessary to style native HTML controls while also retaining…

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Tags: accessibility, css, html, usability, UX, WHCM

Under-Engineered Toggles Too

Updated Intro Whether you use a <button> or <input type=”checkbox”> for your toggle depends on a few factors: Use <button> if: you can count on JavaScript being available, flipping the toggle has an immediate effect, the toggle will never have an indeterminate state. Continue reading this post. Use <input type=”checkbox”>…

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Tags: accessibility, css, html, usability, UX, WHCM

Maybe Ignore type=search

Another case of the headline saying it all. If you have a valid, accessible search field (with a useful, sensible label) then you can probably ignore type=”search” and use type=”text” instead. I made a code sample you can use for testing in your preferred set-up; it is what I used…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, browser, html, standards, usability, UX

Maybe You Don’t Need a Date Picker

Calendar controls, date pickers, date widgets, whatever you call them, however they are described, they follow the same basic principle — present the user with a calendar to enter a date (and sometimes a time). Chris Blakeley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 The native implementations come from browsers when authors use <input…

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Tags: accessibility, html, JavaScript, usability, UX

Link + Disclosure Widget Navigation

Early in 2017 I filed an issue against WAI-ARIA Authoring Practices (APG) requesting a change to the menu navigation pattern. Despite a great deal of feedback in agreement, it languished. In late 2017 I wrote Don’t Use ARIA Menu Roles for Site Nav and started actively campaigning against the APG…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, standards, usability, UX, WAI, WCAG

Scraping Burned Toast

Google engineers have proposed a new HTML element, <toast> or <std-toast>, that is a container for presenting brief or simple notifications to users. But of course it is not quite that straightforward. Backlash It is going to be impossible to extricate this proposal from the reactions it has garnered. So…

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Tags: html, standards

Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2019

I kind of missed it this year. I was presenting at YGLF and was invested in the other talks, so my annual tweet thread of my accessibility posts since the previous GAAD did not come out on time. Instead I filled up timelines last night. Below are eight tweets with…

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Tags: accessibility, css, html, standards, usability, UX, WCAG

Periodic Table of the Elements

I built this for me. An audience of one. A way to keep sharp the skills that I am not always able to use on a project. My requirements were simple: responsive (print, small screens), accessible (beyond screen readers), and kinda fun. Since it relies on a JSON data source…

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Tags: accessibility, css, html, JavaScript, print, WHCM

Uniquely Labeling Fields in a Table

Many of my clients over the years have relied on fields in tables. Sometimes a checkbox to select a row, sometimes text inputs to update information, sometimes buttons select something. Rarely are they interested in a block of label text above the field, and I cannot disagree with them. The…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, tables, WCAG

Details / Summary Are Not [insert control here]

Once major browsers started supporting <details> & <summary> developers immediately started to play with them to see what sorts of patterns they could enhance or replace. This is a good thing. Experimentation pushes boundaries, improves understanding. However, we need to be careful of christening this new-to-us interaction as the solution…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, standards, usability, UX

Under-Engineered Toggles

Updated Intro Whether you use a <button> or <input type=”checkbox”> for your toggle depends on a few factors: Use <button> if: you can count on JavaScript being available, flipping the toggle has an immediate effect, the toggle will never have an indeterminate state. Go read Under-Engineered Toggles Too. Use <input…

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Tags: accessibility, css, html, usability, UX, WHCM

Web Turns 30, Seems Popular

The world wide web has officially lasted 30 consecutive years, which means it’s catching up to its parent, the Internet, which itself is bearing down on 50. That’s an important distinction. The Internet is not the web; it is the foundation on which the web was born. In honor of…

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Tags: browser, html, internet, W3C

Search icon Used in the search form as a button. Search icon Used in the search form as a button. Information icon Lower-case 'i' in a circle. Checkmark icon Symbol showing a checkmark. Alert icon Exclamation mark within a triangle.